Turkey Next For Islamization?? State Airline Tries Implementing Sharia

Turkey is often considered a moderate Muslim country. Where the government keeps religion and politics completely separate much like the western non Muslim World. Unlike the Islamic nations where political Islamic is prevalent and ruled by the outdated and discriminatory Sharia law such as Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and Iran. Turkey has been able to move forward to a certain extent with the times. With alcohol widely available and no restrictions on women’s dress  forcing the veil or burkas to be worn like is compulsory in many other Muslim lands it has become a popular tourist destination for British and European holiday makers. Tourism is a sizeable chunk of the Turkish economy and provides much needed jobs and income for the locals . 

This is all at risk by the threat of Islamism and the creeping sharia that is being gradually introduced by the ruling Islamist  Justice and Development Party. Under their rule and guidance women in headscarf’s  a becoming a common sight in public and the restriction of alcohol in many places. The  Justice and Development Party lasted move is to try and implement sharia law at the state owned Turkish airlines. They have stopped selling in flight alcoholic drinks, changed the air stewardesses uniform from short skirt to a more Muslim long dress and stopped them wearing make up.

An Islamist Turkey on Europe’s doorstep is not very appealing and would signify a big step in the Muslim quest for World domination .

Turkish Airlines starts implementing Sharia law

First Published: 2013-05-01  Middle East Online
Lipstick ban is latest in string of conservative measures adopted by airline, which have sparked ire of fiercely secular Turks.

 

Efforts to Islamise Turkey gather pace

ANKARA – Turkish Airlines has banned air hostesses from wearing brightly-coloured lipsticks such as red or pink, a move which has sparked fierce debate as the government is accused of trying to Islamise the country, local media reported Wednesday.  Numerous women posted pictures of themselves wearing bright red lipstick on social media websites to protest at the measure, part of a new aesthetics code for stewardesses working for Turkey’s main airline.The lipstick ban is the latest in a string of conservative measures adopted by the airline, which have sparked the ire of fiercely secular Turks.

“This measure is an act of perversion. How else could you describe it?” said Gursel Tekin, vice-president of the main opposition party CHP.Turkish Airlines defended the ban, saying in a statement Tuesday that “simple make-up, immaculate and in pastel colours, is preferred for staff working in the service sector.”In recent months the booming airline — 49 percent state-owned — has also stopped serving alcohol on internal flights.

In February, images of proposed new uniforms for flight attendants bringing in ankle-length dresses and Ottoman-style fez caps were criticised as too conservative. The skirts of Turkish Airlines stewardesses once came in far above the knee.However the more conservative new uniforms have not been adopted.Prime Minister Recep Tayyin Erdogan’s Islamist-rooted Justice and Development Party, in power for over a decade, is often accused of creeping efforts to coerce the country to be more conservative and pious.

Turkey is a fiercely secular state, despite being a majority Muslim country. Under Erdogan’s rule headscarves — banned in public institutions — have become more visible in public places and alcohol bans are more widespread.

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